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Lists

 

Lists may be continuous within text (inline lists) or set off as a series of separate paragraphs (offset lists).

Inline Lists 

Inline list items are numbered as (1), (2), (3), etc.

The numbering of inline list items within ordered offset list items is subordinated to the numbering style of the ordered list item (e.g., (a), (b), (c), etc. within a first-level offset list item). See below.

Offset Lists 

Offset lists may be ordered or unordered. Generally, an offset list should not combine the numbering system of both an ordered and an unordered list.

Ordered Lists

See here for tagging of lists.

Ordered list items are prefixed by numbers or letters as follows:

  • First-level lists: 1., 2., 3., etc.
  • Second-level lists: a., b., c., etc.
  • Third-level lists: i., ii., iii., etc.
  • Fourth-level lists: A., B., C., etc.
  • Fifth-level lists: I., II., III., etc.

Exception: Where a list drawn from a statute, rule, regulation, or similar source closely paraphrases the original text or explains the original items in identical sequence, the numbering of the original text should be adopted (or retained).

Unordered Lists

Unordered list items are prefixed by bullets. Second-level unordered list items are prefixed by en dashes.

Punctuation Preceding Lists 

When a list is preceded by text that is syntactically discontinuous with the text, a colon is used to separate the text and the list.

The following steps should be taken:
1. investigate the scene,
2. interview witnesses, and
3. write a report.

When a list is preceded by text that is syntactically continuous with the text, no punctuation (or, perhaps, a comma) is used to separate the text and the list.

The officer in command on the scene should
1. investigate the scene,
2. interview witnesses, and
3. write a report.
The officer in command on the scene should, in accordance with standard procedure,
1. investigate the scene,
2. interview witnesses, and
3. write a report.

Punctuation of Offset List Items 

The punctuation of offset list items within a publication should be consistent. The copy editor should record her choice of punctuation style. Generally, punctuation styles tend to be either formal (preferred for longer list items) or informal (preferred for short list items). Higher reading level publications (e.g., casebooks) generally always use formal punctuation. Lower reading level publications (e.g., high school texts) generally use a mix of formal and informal punctuation, depending on the list.

In the formal style, list items conclude with punctuation (e.g., a comma, a semicolon, or a period). Where a list item itself contains punctuation (e.g., a comma), the item should conclude with "stronger" punctuation (e.g., a semicolon).

In the informal style, grammatically incomplete list items that are syntactically continuous with the lead-in text do not conclude with punctuation (e.g., no comma, no period), but a period terminates the whole list. Grammatically incomplete list items that are syntactically discontinuous with the lead-in text do not conclude with punctuation (e.g., no comma, no period), and the final list item does not conclude with a period.

Example of informal list with incomplete items that are continuous with lead-in text:

Students can be encouraged to
• interpret, choose, decide, and problem-solve
• extend their thinking to include different experiences that can be used to inform the response
• collaborate with other students and show respect for multiple solutions or responses
• create a product with real-world applicability.

Example of informal list with incomplete items that are discontinuous with lead-in text:

All co-op students must complete the following:
• pre-course interviews
• pre-placement instruction
• ongoing assessment through monitoring meetings with the co-op teacher
• evaluation to determine whether course expectations have been met